When: June - July 2011

Team: Michelle Emma James, Ammon Beyerle, Pete Spence

The Design for an Active City was a competition held in Melbourne as part of the State of Design Festival. It sought implementable, site-specific proposals to improve the pedestrian experience on the northern footpath side of Collins Street Bridge as it spans Wurundjeri Way (approx 50 metres in length) and thereby increase pedestrian activity.

We designed a plywood hoarding that had cutouts to look through, powerpoints for light shows and laptops, and a programme of events that would layer artist interventions in time over the 3 months of its existence. We carefully considered the lifecycle of the materials beyond its installation period and designed a system that could be easily converted into furniture afterwards.

Our approach was to encourage an active city through stopping people or changing speed, engaging passersby in everyday questions and changing meaning through time. In the process of design we occupied the site for a few hours, playing games on the pavement with chalk and bubbles, and asking rhetorical questions of passersby to learn more about the location.


When: June - July 2011

Team: Michelle Emma James, Ammon Beyerle, Pete Spence

The Design for an Active City was a competition held in Melbourne as part of the State of Design Festival. It sought implementable, site-specific proposals to improve the pedestrian experience on the northern footpath side of Collins Street Bridge as it spans Wurundjeri Way (approx 50 metres in length) and thereby increase pedestrian activity.

We designed a plywood hoarding that had cutouts to look through, powerpoints for light shows and laptops, and a programme of events that would layer artist interventions in time over the 3 months of its existence. We carefully considered the lifecycle of the materials beyond its installation period and designed a system that could be easily converted into furniture afterwards.

Our approach was to encourage an active city through stopping people or changing speed, engaging passersby in everyday questions and changing meaning through time. In the process of design we occupied the site for a few hours, playing games on the pavement with chalk and bubbles, and asking rhetorical questions of passersby to learn more about the location.